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Column Ciphers

Column Ciphers, or Poem ciphers have been in use by the intelligence services for some time. Like one time ciphers they require shared knowledge of a code – but in this case the code isn’t used to painstakingly encode every single letter but used to create a column cipher. How do you make column ciphers? …

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Vigenère cipher

A Vigenere cipher is a form of letter substitution cipher that is incredibly difficult to break. It operates by changing the cipher shift number on each letter used. It is very easy to understand and use, but despite this it took 300 years before anyone was able to break it successfully. Many more complex ciphers …

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Caesar Ciphers

Caesar ciphers are one of the earliest known and simplest ciphers we use in Cosykiller. They are very common and it is probably one of the first ciphers you will have come in contact with as it’s often used in education to teach problem solving. It is a type of letter substitution cipher in which …

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Directional codes

Directional codes are probably some of the easiest codes to work with in Cosykiller. These codes rely on you reading the text in a way that isn’t the traditional left to right pattern. The likelihood is you will have come across these style of codes before, as this is how acrostic poetry is made.  In …

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Knock Code

Knock Codes, sometimes called Tap Code come up intermittently in our Cosykiller boxes. The example below is a telegram written with a classic Knock Code cipher. (We used this on a cruise we did in 2018). Knock Code ciphers encode messages using just 10 letters rather than the usual 26, which makes them quite easy …

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